C++ Keyword inline and .inl Files

While at the bar a group of friends jokingly mocked some of the more silly features of C++. The initial banter consisted of how the STL implemented everything including the kitchen sink, though forgot to implement std::girlfriend.

Wouldn’t std::girlfriend be great? We can plug in any type of girlfriend we want into the template parameters and the compiler will just generate one for us! Why in the world would std::girlfriend be omit from STL?

Oh of course, std::girlfriend was never implemented because everyone is just going to put in way too many specific template types (super hot, not crazy) and it’ll just end in a bunch of “failed to specialize template” error messages. And then the moment too many of the template parameters are removed we’ll just get a bunch of “multiple symbols defined” linker errors! Maybe it was a good idea to never implement std::girlfriend in the first place. After all, a girlfriend prefixed with std might make one thing of something other than C++…

Jokes aside I brought up the fact that inline is totally useless for inlining. The only real reason to use the inline keyword (in my opinion) is to able to define functions within a header. Well, I brought it up as a joke, but not really a joke, and that’s the joke.

The inline keyword and .inl files can actually be a pretty nice organizational tool for code, and I’ve found it helps users that didn’t write the implementation understand the code.

Say we are implementing some kind of algorithm that stores elements in an array. Elements need to refer to one another (perhaps to build intrusive linked lists), although these arrays ought to be relocated in memory without requiring any complex copy routines; a single memcpy should yield a new and valid copy.

One way to do so is to make use of array indices instead of pointers. Usually a myriad of small helper functions will arise to clean up all of the array indexing that usually ensues shortly after this kind of code crops up. It’s a huge pain to look into a .cpp and have to continually navigate passed a lot of tiny and trivial helper functions just to understand the algorithm.

These small helpers can be swept to the side into a .inl file. The .inl file signature immediately tells the user what kind of code resides within (either templates or inlined functions), and usually this kind of code isn’t very necessary to understand the more heavy duty code within the .cpp file.

Here’s a mock example:

Aren’t these example files pretty easy going to read? I’m sure you at least scanned the .inl file briefly, and will probably never really need to look at it again. Time will be well spent in the .cpp file with less code to clog your brain. And who knows, maybe the compiler (or perhaps the linker) actually cares a little bit when we type the inline keyword.

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