Monthly Archives: October 2013

Protip: How to be a Physics Dev – Debug Rendering

Today I figured out the single most important tip I could ever give anyone in regards to being a competent physics engine developer. I will share this tip right here on my humble blog:

Your skills as a physics developer will grow at a rate proportional to how good your debug draw information is. I’d actually argue that your skills as a physics developer are proportional to how good your debug draw is.

I feel I’m at a decent place in my skills, as I feel my debug draw has become decent. Lets get some screenshots going!

Initial simplex during Quick Hull.

Initial simplex during Quick Hull.

Stack of polyhedron (OBB meshes). The blue and red contacts are warm started (red is warm started consistently over many frames).

Stack of polyhedron (OBB meshes). The blue and red contacts are warm started (red is warm started consistently over many frames).

Spent a lot of time creating Maya-like camera controls with orbiting.

Spent a lot of time creating Maya-like camera controls with orbiting.

I digress. I didn’t figure out this simple fact on my own; I gleaned this wisdom off of my friend Nathan Carlson. He pointed out that the reason a lot of students at DigiPen have trouble with computational geometry and general physics engine development due to a lack of debug rendering.

Just take a look at Dirk Gregorius’s sample demo from his GDC 2013 lecture. He fully renders Gauss maps, a minkoswki difference, and has glorius camera controls. I actually copied his camera design and implemented it myself. You can see that he has Ant Tweakbar integrated as well, for various tweaking tasks. Erin Catto has lots and lots of different tests, asserts, and most important of all tons of debug drawing for his Box2D library. The Zero team on the third floor of DigiPen definitely has the craziest debug draw I’ve ever heard of!

Hopefully I can achieve something at least in the likeness of all these other developers, and I recommend readers do the same; intuition is often best built visually when it comes to geometry.